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Dutch Jan Hagel

jan_hagel

My dad is Canadian. He was adopted when he was a baby and raised Dutch. Which means that he was exposed to many delicious Dutch treats that many Americans have never had or heard of. To name a few, some of them are Boterkoek, (pronounced boat-er cuek) which when translated, means “butter cake”. It’s basically an almond coffee cake. Another one is Zand Taartjes, or berry tarts, and Jan Hagel. When my parents got married, my Dad’s mom gave him some of her Dutch recipes. My mom has made the Botercoek a few times. This past weekend I wanted to make cookies and my dad suggested I make Jan Hagel. “What’s THAT?” I asked. The recipe was provided and I set out to make them! Jan Hagel, pronounced “Yon Ha-ghul” (you know, with that weird German gh sound you do in the back of your throat?) is sort of a coffee cake cookie. The ingredients are butter, egg yolk, sugar, flour, cinnamon, nuts. Sound intriguing? Read on.

First you cream together the butter, egg yolk, and sugar.

jan_hagel_purrfectlyinspired

Sift the flour and cinnamon together.

jan_hagel_yummy

Then add the dry ingredients to the creamed mixture a little at a time.

yummy_dutch_treats

Spread out on a baking sheet, spread egg white to give it a shine, and add chopped nuts. I used slivered almonds, but walnuts or pecans would also be delightful as well.

dutch_cookies

Bake for 25-40 minutes, until golden brown like this…

jan_hagel_recipe

Then cut into squares while still warm. Then take a bite.
yummy_dutch_cookie

I couldn’t stop eating them, so I suggest you give them away (My violin teacher is seeing some of these tomorrow) or hide them. Eating one leads to another. But do me a favor and make a quadruple batch and freeze some. Because you will want these all the time. I promise. :)

CLICK HERE FOR THE PDF RECIPE.

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